Stanley Stiver: Community stiver

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I believe we owe giving something back to the community and the area; to not always be taking—we have to give too. I want to give back because I really have been given much.
Rev. Stanley Stiver


"He has been called the ultimate volunteer. His congregation wont argue with that. He's never too retired to serve community, people and God."

From Larry Clark, "Never too retired: In 60th year of ordination pastor still in demand," Hickory Daily Record, June 2, 2007, p. A11.


Article on retirement
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From Larry Clark, "Never too retired: In 60th year of ordination pastor still in demand," Hickory Daily Record, June 2, 2007, p. A11. Used by permission of Hickory Daily Record.
"Stanley Stiver came here at a time when there was a transition in our society,"commented Sidney Halma, executive director of the Catawba County Historical Association. "It was the era of the post-war boom, the baby boom. People were looking to the future, and he helped a small community develop a sense of itself. He made people feel good about their community, which until then had been a sleepy little town. He was saying, 'Look here, people, take note of what you have here.'"

From Sylvia Ray, "Commendable Catawbans," Past Times, Vol 13 (3), 2002: pp. 3-4



"The resume of Stanley Stiver looks like one for a corporate tycoon. The list of groups for which he has served as president is lengthy, including Wheeling Club, Piedmont and Claremont PADA, Eastern Catawba and Catawba County Chambers, the Catawba Valley Chapter of the Red Cross, Catawba County Library Board of Trustees, Eastern Catawba Cooperative Christian Ministry, the county's civic center referendum committee, Catawba County Elder Plan, the Eastern Catawba United Way. He also served on the charter board of the consolidated county-wide United Way."

From Sylvia Ray, "Commendable Catawbans," Past Times, Vol 13 (3), 2002: pp. 3-4.


Commendable Catawbans
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From Sylvia Ray, "Commendable Catawbans," Past Times, Vol 13 (3), 2002: pp. 3-4. Used by permission of Catawba County Historical Association and Sylvia Ray.

"Pastor Stanley Stiver's leadership and influence on the City of Claremont and Eastern Catawba County will live on forever. He took a sleepy little town and woke in us a vision of the future with excitement and enthusiasm. His positive and can-do attitude showed to us that nothing is impossible. Today we have more industries within the City of Claremont than any other city our size in the state of North Carolina.We have tremendous participation of citizens within our churches and the community in various types of activities,and we have a lot of leadership ability in the community. I attribute all of these things and more to Pastor Stiver."

Glenn Morrison, mayor of Claremont, email October 2, 2007.


"If I tried to tell you all the things this man has accomplished, we're going to be here all day," she remarked while awarding the Rev. Stiver 1998 Volunteer of the Year.

Doris Fish, executive director of Easter Catawba Cooperative Ministry, cited in Monte Mitchell, “Local volunteers make promises to community,” The Observer News Enterprise, October 2, 1998, p. 1.


"Stiver is affectionately known as 'a walking, talking chamber of commerce," by Ron Leitch, executive vice president of the Catawba County Chamber of Commerce. In 1980, the chamber named Stiver its Outstanding Citizen for 'extraordinary contributions to the economic, civic, cultural and educational betterment of Catawba County and its cities, towns and communities.'"

Pat Borden, “Magnificent Obsession is Easy Cross to Bear,” The Charlotte Observer, November 19, 1982, p 5C.


"Ever since I came here back in 1986 I wanted to start a program for widowed persons, but I was very particular about who headed that up for me. Just out of the blue one day after he had retired, he came walking up the sidewalk of the funeral home and came walking in, and said, 'I've been thinking about something. I'd like to head up a widowed persons program for you.'"

Stuart Terry, chief operating office at Drum Funeral Home, in Monte Mitchell, “He's retiring, but don't haul out rocking chair just yet,” The Charlotte Observer, November 19, 1995, p. 1V, 4V.



See additional articles at Stanley Stiver: Retirement.

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